Locations & Land Acknowledgements

Newtown, CT

Traditional homeland of the Pootatuck people

In Newtown, we operate programs on the un-ceded and traditional homeland of the Pootatucks, a subset of the Paugussett Nation. We ask you to join us in acknowledging these communities, their elders both past and present, as well as future generations. We hold in our hearts and awareness the great historical and contemporary harm carried out against the Pootatuck people and commit to walk together in solidarity towards a more regenerative and equitable future.

The land that we use in Newtown is now called Sticks and Stones Farm, a 60-acre privately owned property that is open to the public. Known by its landmark stone barn and homegrown cabins, the farm opens its doors and hiking trails to the Newtown community, Fairfield County, Brooklynites and beyond.

197 Huntingtown Road
Newtown, CT 06470


Granby, CT

Traditional homeland of the Tunxis and Agawam people

In Granby, we operate programs on un-ceded Massacoe lands, the traditional homeland of the Tunxis and Agawam people. We ask you to join us in acknowledging the Massacoe community, their elders both past and present, as well as future generations. We hold in our hearts and awareness the great historical and contemporary harm carried out against the Tunxis and Agawam people and commit to walk together in solidarity towards a more regenerative and equitable future. 

The land that we use in Granby is now known as Holcomb Farm, a 367-acre working farm and community gathering place operated collaboratively between the Town of Granby, Connecticut and a Board of Directors comprised of local citizens.

113 Simsbury Road
West Granby, CT 06090


Killingworth, CT

Traditional homeland of the Hammonasset, Quinnipiac, and Wappinger peoples

In Killingworth, we operate programs on the un-ceded and traditional homeland of the Hammonasset, Quinnipiac, and Wappinger peoples. We ask you to join us in acknowledging these peoples, their elders both past and present, future generations, and any we may have forgotten. We hold in our hearts and awareness the great historical and contemporary harm carried out against the Hammonasset, Quinnipiac, and Wappinger people and commit to walk together in solidarity towards a more regenerative and equitable future.

The land that we use in Killingworth is now known as Chatfield Hollow State Park, a 400-acre state recreation area that is open to the public. Through its ridges covered with oak, beech, and hickory flows the Chatfield Hollow brook toward Long Island. In pre-Colonial times, Native people frequented the valley in considerable numbers for purposes of fishing and hunting. Many artifacts found in the vicinity of Indian Council Caves indicated that Native Americans sought refuge in the jagged ledges and held tribal gatherings amid the rock recesses and overhangs.


381 Route 80
Killingworth, CT 06419

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To learn more about the practice of Land Acknowledgements, please visit Native-Land.ca. To learn about the Native land that you are living or working on, text the name of your city, state to (907) 312-5085.